the approachable architect podcast

think twice before reaching for that air conditioner button

ball-fan

modern company's ball fan

any way you slice it, air conditioners are electricity hogs. they are the suped up SUV version of the appliances in your home and they consume large amounts of electricity. whole house air conditioners can use anywhere from 15 to 25 kWh (kilowatt-hours)  of electricity per day (assuming about 4 hours of usage). at 14 cents per kWh, that’s about $3.50 per day. considering the average home consumes about 20 – 30 kWh per day, 4 hours of  air conditioner use almost doubles the daily consumption to a whopping 55 kWh per day. now you’re at about $7.00 a day for electricity.

now, that may not sound like much, but if you’re running your air conditioner everyday, that will be an additional $105 on top of your normal electrical bill (the average monthly electrical bill in the US is about $95 for around 900 kWh of electricity). multiply that by 4 months and that is an additional $420. it adds up, especially when you don’t pay attention to the time your a/c is on or your electricity bill. so here are a few tips that may help you limit the time your a/c runs;

1. turn up that thermostat to 78 degrees. “wait a minute, what??? you mean you want me to turn my thermostat UP to 78 degrees? i thought i am supposed to turn it down for my a/c. that means my air conditioner won’t even kick on until it gets warmer than 78? i like my home to be an ice box. i prefer a nice chilly 64. i like to run my air conditioner 24/7, i can’t sleep otherwise. but i admit, i don’t like the $500 a month electrical bill.” i hear you but i challenge you to give it a try. even if you do it for a few days, you’ll save electricity and money. check out this cool website that shows you the cost of your thermostat setting when deviating from 78  http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/energy/sponsor/save-money-save-energy

2. use those ceiling fans. “but i don’t have ceiling fans installed in the house and i don’t really like those combo things at home depot.” ugly ceiling fans are no longer an excuse, check out the modern fan company’s selection of cool, modern fans. the ball is my favorite. you’ll pay for the cost of the fans and installation in a few seasons by limiting the use of the a/c and turning these guys on instead.

3. use a programmable thermostat. along with a setting of 78 degrees, a programmable thermostat will help you limit the amount of time your a/c stays on, thus reducing your electricity bill. your savings in one year can pay for this nifty unit (it works great for the heating in the winter too).

4. open those doors and windows. “but it’s hot outside, why do i want to open the doors and windows.”  a simple concept that has been around since the beginning of time,  called passive ventilation. if you open your doors and windows, you’ll create cross ventilation and bring an airflow into your home. along with your ceiling fans, you can really start move that air around your house. this doesn’t mean you’ll never have to use your air conditioner again (unless you live near the beach), but it will help you limit the use of your a/c unit. as i mentioned earlier, every little bit helps.

5. seal those ducts. if your ductwork is in the attic or in the crawlspace under your house, have them professionally sealed and tested for leaks. the ductwork is moving that cool air through the house and you don’t want it leaking into the attic or in the crawlspace (or anywhere else for that matter).

6. eat lots of otter pops. a nice frozen treat that will help you feel cool on hot summer days,  http://www.otterpopstars.com/

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