029. approachable architect podcast – anatomy of a master bath remodel

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episode 029. anatomy of a master bath remodel

  • in this episode, i discuss the factors involved in a master bath remodel including establishing budgetary numbers for individual trades and line items.

ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES: i specialize in providing architectural design services for environmentally friendly, healthy, high performance, and energy efficient homes including major remodels, second story additions, and new construction. please contact me at the studio at 310.391.9191 or david@residearchitecture.com if you would like to discuss your project.

banyan master bath part 2. which option do you like?

i’ve done some revisions to our banyan master bath and i’m thinking it is really looking architectural. the client and i were concerned about the tall storage cabinet being too big so i decided to cut the cabinet and let the counter continue underneath. you’ll notice in option 1, the base cabinet touches the floor, and in option 2 it floats completely making much more a a horizontal statement. i also cut the wall next to the cabinet back as well.

i have a couple ideas on things to tweak further but i want to know what you think. tell me which one you like and why?

option #1 – revised                                                                                option #2 – revised                    

option 1 - revisedbathroom_rev_3b2

yogis anonymous . a cool new yoga studio

yogis anonymous new spacei just returned from visiting my friends’, dorian cheah & ally hamilton’s, new yoga studio in santa monica called yogis anonymous. i had been helping them out with the design for the last couple of months and construction is just about completed. the space was previously a hair salon and my friends transformed it into a cool, green yoga studio. dorian and ally selected an environmentally friendly pre-finished bamboo floor made by smith & fong called plyboo. this floor is formaldehyde free as well as FSC certified. they also specified a no-VOC paint by dunn edwards.

yogis anonymous is a new kind of studio. rather than utilizing the standard method that involves the participant purchasing individual classes or a series of classes, yogis anonymous functions on the premise of a donation system. participants pay what they are most comfortable with. i think this will create much more of a community environment at the studio. with already over 1300 fans on their facebook fan page, i’d say the strategy is working, considering they haven’t even opened their doors yet. they will be having a big launch party this saturday evening for anyone in the los angeles area, details can be found on their fan page.

they are also putting on a “human logo contest” and accepting entries for interpretations of couples performing their interpretation of their new logo. my wife came up with the idea of entering our boys, so we created our own entry. yes it is photoshopped (getting two boys to do that pose at the SAME TIME is impossible when they are 1 and 3 years old) but they each did perform the pose and yes, jake did do a headstand, albeit with the help of wendy’s hand that is photoshopped out of the pic.

if your in santa monica, be sure to check out the studio. ally hamilton is well known in the yoga community and she has put together a powerhouse lineup of super-duper yoga instructors. makes me want to get back into yoga…

yogis anonymous
yogis anonymous logo
yoga pose
jake & remy do the YA logo

banyan. living room and master bath

here are a couple of “rough” computer renderings of our banyan project.

in the living room, notice the new open stair and how it helps the space feel more open. also notice the new entry way and frosted glass that will allow more light into to the room but maintain the privacy.

banyan stair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

in the master bath, below, notice the large sink, selected by the owner and double faucets. also notice the large shower and skylight. this room will be great!

banyan bath1

energy audit: a look at your electric bill

my electric bill
my electric bill

let’s talk about your electric bill. an average size home in america consumes between 600 to 900 kWh per month. this will obviously vary depending on what part of the country you live in (and what is considered average), but it’s a good starting point. let’s break that down even further because i believe when we have an understanding we can relate to, we’re more apt to make small changes that can have big impacts, both on the environment and in your wallet.

i’m going to work with the 600 kWh usage per month and use that as a basis for our understanding. if we divide 600 kWh by # days in a month, 30, that would mean we are consuming 20 kWh of electricity per day. let’s assume we’re paying .14 cents per kilowatt hour (the rate will vary by area but generally will be between .10 and .14) so we’re spending $2.80 per day on electricity for our home. that will give us a bill of about $84 per month. if you’re consuming 900 kWh per month, your bill will more likely be $126 per month.

one note: make sure you read your electric bill correctly. it will be either based on one month or two months, just make sure you know which one and adjust your figures accordingly.

SO, you’re now looking at your electric bill and you say, “oh yeah, i see, my bill is about $100 per month and that fits within the average so that must mean i’m doing good and can keep doing what i’ve been doing all along.”  does this sound like you? let me clear up one thing here, AVERAGE DOES NOT EQUAL GOOD. just because everyone else in the country is averaging $100 a month electric bill, doesn’t mean you should too. there are simple ways to get that down. and we’ve all heard them, turn off lights when not in the room, replace bulbs with compact flourescents (which i’m not a fan of, that’s another article), run the air conditioner set at 78, to name a few.  even if you knock it down $10 a month, you’ll save $120 per year.

let’s put all of this in perspective. i live with my wife and two young boys in a modest, 1 story 1500 s.f. older home. we moved in this past january and i’ve been looking at our bills since we moved in. our power is supplied by los angeles department of water and power. we get a bill from them every two months and it covers solid resources fee, water servce, and energy service (electric). our electric bill averages about 650 kWh per billing cycle, that’s for two months. SO we are consuming 325 kWh per month, well below the national average. we aren’t doing anything special either. we have a mixture of incadescent bulbs and compact flourescents. the most important thing we do is to not leave lights on around the house and turn off lights when we leave the room. we also haven’t run the air conditioner yet and rely on opening doors and windows instead. i’m sure at some point we will turn it on this summer, which may push us into the 400+ Kwh range, but we’ll see. one important note here is that our stove, dryer (electric dryers do cost more to operate than gas dryers), and furnace are heated via natural gas.

assuming you pulled out your electric bill for this exercise, you should have been able to locate how much you are using per month, then how much you use per day, and finally how much you are spending on electricity per day. just having an understanding of this will prove beneficial to you. i have found that once we have an understanding of something, we tend to pay better attention to it. the less we understand something, the more likely we will pay less attention or ignore it altogether. did i mention my wife is a psychotherapist?

think twice before reaching for that air conditioner button

ball-fan
modern company's ball fan

any way you slice it, air conditioners are electricity hogs. they are the suped up SUV version of the appliances in your home and they consume large amounts of electricity. whole house air conditioners can use anywhere from 15 to 25 kWh (kilowatt-hours)  of electricity per day (assuming about 4 hours of usage). at 14 cents per kWh, that’s about $3.50 per day. considering the average home consumes about 20 – 30 kWh per day, 4 hours of  air conditioner use almost doubles the daily consumption to a whopping 55 kWh per day. now you’re at about $7.00 a day for electricity.

now, that may not sound like much, but if you’re running your air conditioner everyday, that will be an additional $105 on top of your normal electrical bill (the average monthly electrical bill in the US is about $95 for around 900 kWh of electricity). multiply that by 4 months and that is an additional $420. it adds up, especially when you don’t pay attention to the time your a/c is on or your electricity bill. so here are a few tips that may help you limit the time your a/c runs;

1. turn up that thermostat to 78 degrees. “wait a minute, what??? you mean you want me to turn my thermostat UP to 78 degrees? i thought i am supposed to turn it down for my a/c. that means my air conditioner won’t even kick on until it gets warmer than 78? i like my home to be an ice box. i prefer a nice chilly 64. i like to run my air conditioner 24/7, i can’t sleep otherwise. but i admit, i don’t like the $500 a month electrical bill.” i hear you but i challenge you to give it a try. even if you do it for a few days, you’ll save electricity and money. check out this cool website that shows you the cost of your thermostat setting when deviating from 78  http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/energy/sponsor/save-money-save-energy

2. use those ceiling fans. “but i don’t have ceiling fans installed in the house and i don’t really like those combo things at home depot.” ugly ceiling fans are no longer an excuse, check out the modern fan company’s selection of cool, modern fans. the ball is my favorite. you’ll pay for the cost of the fans and installation in a few seasons by limiting the use of the a/c and turning these guys on instead.

3. use a programmable thermostat. along with a setting of 78 degrees, a programmable thermostat will help you limit the amount of time your a/c stays on, thus reducing your electricity bill. your savings in one year can pay for this nifty unit (it works great for the heating in the winter too).

4. open those doors and windows. “but it’s hot outside, why do i want to open the doors and windows.”  a simple concept that has been around since the beginning of time,  called passive ventilation. if you open your doors and windows, you’ll create cross ventilation and bring an airflow into your home. along with your ceiling fans, you can really start move that air around your house. this doesn’t mean you’ll never have to use your air conditioner again (unless you live near the beach), but it will help you limit the use of your a/c unit. as i mentioned earlier, every little bit helps.

5. seal those ducts. if your ductwork is in the attic or in the crawlspace under your house, have them professionally sealed and tested for leaks. the ductwork is moving that cool air through the house and you don’t want it leaking into the attic or in the crawlspace (or anywhere else for that matter).

6. eat lots of otter pops. a nice frozen treat that will help you feel cool on hot summer days,  http://www.otterpopstars.com/

romaine bathroom in 3d!

i was going through some project pictures the other day and realized i haven’t posted the 3D computer renderings of the romaine bathroom so here you go, oh, and remember these are NOT photographs;

finish-bath-1-croppedfinish-bath-2-cropped